MERV vs HEPA

by Cody Farmer

As we all start to spend more time indoors during the winter, take a minute to ask yourself: Have I changed my filters?

Having an air-tight home with one of our ERVs or HRVs is the best way to ensure you’re breathing clean air. BUT…it doesn’t stop there. You’ll want to check outside the home or office or tiny house and verify the intake and exhaust are clean and free of any obstructions.  Use a vacuum and clean them out. Next it’s time to change the filters. 

 

We offer several types of filters for Lunos e2, Lunos EGO, Zehnder CA-70, Zender CA-200, Zehnder CA-350, Zehnder CA-550 and the AirPohoda. Within these brands and options your winter filter can usually be MERV 8; however, in Summer if you have excessive dust and pollen in your area you may want to upgrade to a MERV13. Find filters here: MainStream Filters

MERV stands for Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value. This is a rating system that tells you how well it filters small particles. They range from 1-16, 16 being the best as it can filter out particles as small as 0.3 microns at a 75% efficiency.

HEPA stands for High Efficiency Particulate Air filters and they rate at 17-20 MERV meaning they can filter out particles as small as 0.3 microns at a 99.97% efficiency! Although these are typically the type of filters that hospitals use to minimize the spread of disease, HEPA also slows down the air flow and makes it harder for your fans to work in their most efficient range. In our airtight buildings the average filter will be the MERV 8.

We received a few owners comments who were unfortunately close to a few forest fires last year that their homes had clean air inside when their neighbors' non air-tight, non Zehnder ventilated homes had lofty smoke smells.

You deserve to breathe clean and easy with healthy indoor air – so does your family. Click here to find out how easy it can be to clean the air in your home!